Cultural
Land Trust

Cultural
Land Trust

Issue

Arts and culture are being priced out of the city.

Escalating real estate prices have placed severe pressure on security of tenure for artists and arts organizations in B.C.

Studio of Jonathan Syme

Fig. 1

Since 2017, 400+ artist production spaces, music and performing arts venues, along with art galleries have been closing rapidly.

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CLT_Fig1
Legend 1
Exists
Legend 5
Under threat of eviction
Legend 5
Lost / no longer exists

Circle size corresponds to number of artists

Key 1
Unknown
Key 2
0-2
Key 3
3-5
Key 4
6-15
Key 5
16-25
Key 6
26-50
Key 7
51-200
Source

Eastside Culture Crawl, 2019. culturecrawl.ca/citywithoutart

Fig. 2

Over 80% of current spaces face displacement.

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to explore map
studios_Map2
Legend 5
High threat
Legend 5
Moderate threat
Legend 1
Low threat
Untitled-2
Not assessed

Circle size corresponds to number of artists

Key 1
Unknown
Key 2
0-2
Key 3
3-5
Key 4
6-15
Key 5
16-25
Key 6
26-50
Key 7
51-200
Source

Eastside Culture Crawl, 2019. culturecrawl.ca/citywithoutart

Fig. 3

Two-thirds of spaces (artist production spaces, music and performing arts venues, art galleries, etc.) have leases for less than 5 years.

1/3
Spaces with 5+ year leases
2/3
Spaces with <5 year leases
Source

City of Vancouver, 2020. Making Space for Arts and Culture. https://vancouver.ca/files/cov/making-space-for-arts-and-culture.pdf

Fig. 4

Annual median income for Indigenous artists is 32% lower than for non-Indigenous artists.

16.6K
Indigenous Artists
median annual income
24.6K
Non-Indigenous Artists
median annual income
37.2K
All Indigenous workers
median annual income
43.7K
All Non-Indigenous workers
median annual income
Source

Hill, Kelly. Hills Strategies, 2020, Demographic Diversity of Artists in Canada in 2016.

Fig. 5

Racialized artists are paid 28% less than non-racialized artists in 2015.

18.2K
Racialized Artists
median annual income
25.4K
Non-Racialized Artists
median annual income
35.6K
All Racialized workers
median annual income
45.7K
All Non-Racialized workers
median annual income
Source

Hill, Kelly. Hills Strategies, 2020, Demographic Diversity of Artists in Canada in 2016.

Solution

Create a land trust for cultural assets to give artists access to the stabilizing force of affordable rent, open pathways to sustainable stewardship and ownership, and build community wealth.

Projection

By 2050, the Cultural Land Trust will have secured 30 properties in British Columbia.

Governance

Independent charitable org with an 11-person governance, with direct representation from tenants.

Mission

To increase long term security of tenure of space for cultural and arts purposes in BC through ownership and stewardship of land and buildings.

Fig. 6

We are currently seeking seed funding.

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How it works

Creating the material conditions that keep artists and cultural organizations in the city.

Studio of Kate Metten
Decommodify Land

Freehold ownership and community governance mitigates speculative real estate market.

Encourage Collaborative Investments

Accountable investment vehicle combines philanthropy with grants and municipal rezoneings.

Advance Reconciliation & Equity

Meaningful BIPOC and equity-deserving participation in governance and trust assets.

Align Regulation & Increase Capacity

Sharing collective solution as model across Canada; providing government regulatory feedback.

Arts and cultural organizations and funders make up the Cultural Land Trust board with a majority of members who are Black, Indigenous, and/or racialized.

1

Funds and buildings are received from government and philanthropic sources.

2

Buildings are financed, acquired and/or developed for cultural uses.

3

Arts and cultural nonprofit partners are engaged through long-term leases or equity ownership with a focus on equity-deserving communities.

4

Security of tenure is achieved and properties are removed from speculative market.

5

Land trust assets are leveraged for additional growth.

6

Land trust becomes a core advocate for regulatory improvements and cultural sector learning.

7

CULTURAL LAND TRUST IS SELF-SUSTAINING AND GROWS.

About Us

Who we are and why us?

Credit: Damaris Riedinger

221A is supporting the research, planning and startup of a Cultural Land Trust for the particular challenge facing arts and culture organizations, centered on the lower mainland.

Seed Funding Working Group

Brian McBay, Staff
Carmut Me, Staff
TOMO Spaces, Consultant

Business Planning Consultants

Andy Broderick
Lara Honrado
Keith Jardine
Ginger Gosnell-Myers

Advisors & Supporters

Am Johal, Advisory
Ann McDonell, Advisory
Bopha Chhay, Advisory
Emiko Morita, Advisory
Glenn Alteen, Advisory
Jeff Derksen, Advisory
Jennifer Johnstone, Advisory
Sabine Bitter, Advisory
Eastside Arts District
City of Vancouver

BC_Arts_Council
CanadianHeritage
CCA
CNCLT
EAS
seara
Vancouver
Timeline

History and progress

Studio of Kat Pino
November 2019

Idea validation

2019

Incorporated into City Policy

December 2022

Business case

December 2022

Incorporation

Fall 2023

Governance & Seed funding

Winter 2024

Startup

Spring 2024

Acquisition & Development

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